MORRIS MINOR MM & SERIES II ROAD TEST PORTFOLIO

MORRIS MINOR MM & SERIES II ROAD TEST PORTFOLIO

 

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Código:
22228
Idioma:
INGLES
Editorial:
BROOKLANDS BOOKS LTD
Nº edición:
1
Materia
Marcas en varios idiomas
ISBN:
978-1-85520-936-7
Páginas:
160
Encuadernación:
PORTADA EN RUSTICA
Medidas:
280 mm x 210 mm
25,00 €
IVA incluido
Disponible en 1 mes desde la compra
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The Morris Minor, designed by Alec Issigonis was an instant hit when it made it debut at the first post war Motor Show held at Earl's Court in London in 1948. The optimism expressed then proved to be well founded as the vehicles went on to enjoy a twenty two year production run and in the process enabled the British Motor Corporation to become the first British motor manufacturer to produce one million units based on the same basic design. The cornerstone of that success was the split windscreen models produced between 1948 and 1956. The first model, the Morris Minor Series MM, was produced in 2 door saloon and Tourer versions. Powered by a 918cc sidevalve engine, it featured many revolutionary features including independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, 14 inch road wheels and a compact yet distinctive body shape. Despite all the plaudits not to mention, all the meticulous planning and attention to detail which had gone into Issigonis's innovative design, it was unexpectedly subjected to a major styling change within a year of production starting. The original decision to locate the headlamps low down, either side of the grille panel, fell foul of American lighting laws. With the emphasis firmly on export markets in an ailing post war economy, a quick return to the drawing board proved essential. The result was a quick revision to the front wings with the headlamps located high up in a newly designed pod. In spite of the fact that the modification reduced the top speed of the early side valve engine cars by 1 mile per hour, it remained a feature of all subsequent Morris Minor models.
By 1950 the model range had been increased. A new four door saloon model was introduced. Though initially available only for export, it soon proved popular and by 1951 it was being produced for the home market. Overall, sales were exceeding all expectations and Morris Motors Ltd, keen to maximise the export potential of their new range of post war cars, invested heavily in a new CKD facility adjacent to the Cowley works. Soon Morris Minors were being assembled from Completely Knocked Down kits in Ireland, India, Denmark, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Within the British Motor industry other big developments were on the horizon. Morris Motors Ltd headed by William Morris and the Austin Motor Company guided by Herbert Austin were great rivals. However in 1952 they merged to form the British Motor Corporation Ltd, better known as BMC Ltd. This merger was destined to have a significant influence on the future development of the Morris Minor. Series MM production continued until February 1953 by which time 172,052 vehicles had been produced. However in late 1952, following the merger to form BMC, changes were already underway. The first tangible signs of co-operation between Austin and Morris emerged when the decision was announced that Series ll Morris Minors would utilise the 803cc engine and gearbox as fitted to the Austin A30 models. Most observers agreed that the somewhat dated 918cc side valve engine needed replacing, but marque rivalries and tradition, not to mention the experience of some of the factory engineers, cast doubt on the suitability of the 'A' Series unit and accompanying gearbox for use in the Morris Minor. For a time Series MM models and the new Series ll models were produced side by side. The only tangible outward sign which distinguished the models was a restyled bonnet badge. The major difference was the engine and transmission. In spite of the reservations, top speed performance was improved though some industry experts questioned the effectiveness of the gear ratios.

With the phasing out of the Series MM models the opportunity was taken in 1953 to expand the model range. In May 1953 Morris Minor light commercial vehicles were introduced. Van and Pick-up models were a welcome addition and proved popular with many commercial operators. With their streamlined looks, low running costs and ease of access, the Morris Minor 5cwt LCV's soon became a familiar sight on British High Streets. Large contracts were negotiated with specialist operators such as the General Post Office. Their special liveried vehicles attracted much attention and featured many non- standard components, including rubber wings on the front with externally fitted headlights! The establishment of these early contracts was to pay dividends as the Morris Minor was destined to become one of the most popular vehicles for Royal Mail deliveries and Post Office Telephone engineers during the 1950's and 1960's. October 1953 heralded the introduction of what was to be the last model in the Morris Minor range. Identified initially as the Morris Minor Station Wagon it became known as the Traveller's Car. The wooden backed Traveller's Car was a belated arrival. The larger bodied Morris Oxford Series MO range had incorporated just such a model as early as 1950. However it needed the availability of the more powerful A Series engine to enable plans to introduce the Morris Minor version to progress. It too proved popular. Travelling salesmen were a familiar sight in the 1950's and many relished the prospect of the additional storage space provided by the fold down rear seats as well as the comfort offered by such a versatile and economical vehicle. Production of the full range of Morris Minors continued until 1956 when in a major styling update the split windscreen which characterised all of the early Morris Minors was dispensed with. In total 500,00 vehicles had been produced. Enthusiasm for these vehicles was immense in the late 1940's and early 1950's, even when it was almost impossible for the ordinary British citizen to get hold of a new model due to the high percentage of vehicles which went for export. Nevertheless, the popularity of the cars remained high, as did their reputation for reliability, ease of maintenance and economy. Contemporary road tests and motoring reports all attested to the superb design which was considered to be ahead of its time. Today, surviving models, wherever they are in the world, attract considerable attention and evoke memories of a bygone era. Family and business associations are often brought to mind as are fond memories of particular vehicles and even their number plates. Though decades have elapsed since these vehicles rolled off the production line they still have the ability to raise a smile. Hopefully the following pages which catalogue many facts of the Morris Minor Series MM and Series ll Morris Minors manufactured between 1948 and 1956 will do just that. Included are road and used car tests, new model introductions and updates plus full specifications, service data and a model profile together with service data. Also featured are articles on Supercharging and restoration. Professional advice is offered on acquiring a good classic early Morris Minor.

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